Stella Maris Catholic Parish

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Advent Reflection Week 3.

Sunday 17 December

                                                                                                               

 

Call to Worship

Be patient! God is coming to us!

THE ONE WHO TEACHES JOYOUS SONGS TO ALL CREATION

COMES TO OPEN OUR EARS TO LIFE.

 

Be Strong! God is coming to be with us!

THE ONE WHO PAVES A PATH TO BETHLEHEM WILL WALK

WITH US EVERY STAP OF THE WAY.

 

Do not fear!  Here is your God!

WE WORSHIP THE ONE WHO COMES TO STAY WITH US

 

 

 

Advent Reflection Week 2.

Sunday 10 December

                                                                                                              

 

                                       Advent Prayer of Confession:

Ever present Peace, you came to save us,

but that is so hard to remember in this hectic season.

Our impatience for Christmas to arrive gets in the way

of listening to our children singing in their rooms.

 

We let blinking lights blind us to your

quiet presence in our noisy world.

 

We get so caught up in the stories of violence we cannot hear

your voice reminding us not to be afraid.

 

Gardener of deserts, as you poured out your mercy on all

who have gone before us, shower us with grace and forgiveness.

Then, our eyes will be opened to all your wonders,

our ears will echo with the anthems of the angels,

and our emptiness will be filled with the life

gifted to us through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen

 

© Thom M Shuman. Wild Goose Publication, UK.

 

 

Advent Week 1.

Sunday 3 December

                                                                                                     

A sense of anticipation is central to liturgical celebrations during Advent. The obvious – but not necessarily most important  focal point is the anticipation of the feast of Christmas, when the first coming of Christ is remembered. But Advent is also the season of the second coming. Some may find this aspect a little uncomfortable and hence shy away from it, focusing instead on Christmas cribs and nativity scenes.

The season of Advent falls between the solemnity of Christ the King with its own echoes of the triumphant return of the Saviour and the feast of Christmas. Advent celebrations should pick up the feelings of joyful expectation that the celebrations anticipate. The marks of Advent are preparation, expectation and joyful anticipation.
(E. Harrington. Liturgy Lines. © Liturgy Brisbane.)

For our reflection this week:

Dear ones of God. This is the good news:

God comes to us to bring the healing of hope,

to put the joy of justice into our hearts.

We need wait no longer.

We will go and tell everyone

What we have seen and heard.

Thanks be to God…….Amen

(© Thom. M Shuman. Wild Goose Publications. UK.)

 

Advent coming.

Sunday 26 November

Today being the feast of Christ the King means that next week we begin the wonderful season of Advent.

Advent and Christmas express a deep but often forgotten aspect of the Christian mystery – its incompleteness. To be a follower of Jesus is to live in incompleteness and to live out that incompleteness in our lives. We live in the in-between time: the time between Christ’s coming in the flesh and in history and his future revelation in glory.

This incompleteness is clear in the readings and prayers of Advent. This season so often calls on the prophet Isaiah to ring his visionary bells in announcing the future to us, to look forward to tell us what he sees, to excite us and raise up our anticipation of what God will do when he comes. But we listen to his prophet words with our feet firmly on the ground in our present confused, violent and radically unequal world.

There is a clash between his words and our world to which we listen intently and which we take to ourselves, which we ponder in communion with that other figure of Advent – Mary of Nazareth.  Even when the liturgy puts the words, actions and miracles of Jesus in alignment with Isaiah’s vision, the actions of Jesus don’t seem to measure up to the world-shaking and world-consoling imagery of the prophet. The visions of Isaiah are only achieved in the resurrection of Jesus himself, in that resurrected creation which our eyes cannot yet see; it remains for us the promise of what is to come.”

Fr Frank O’Loughlin. © The Commission for Liturgy Archdiocese of Melbourne.  Diocesan Liturgical Centre. 1982

Let us prepare our hearts this week for the season of Advent.